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Seminar med Jerry Rosiek, University of Oregon

Institutt for lærerutdanning, NTNU arrangerer sammen med filosofigruppa ved DMMH et seminar med Jerry Rosiek fra University of Oregon.


Kontaktpersoner:
 Merete Moe, 73805249/93830756 og Lise Hovik, 73805224/90840702

Jerry Lee Rosiek er professor I Education Studies ved universitetet i Oregon, der han gir kurs i minoritetspolitikk i utdanning og kvalitativ forskningsmetodologi. I sin forskning har han undersøkt bruk av fiksjon og narrative uttrykksformer og er opptatt av revisjonistisk pragmatisme, nymaterialisme, kritisk raseteori og urbefolkningsstudier. Han skriver for Harvard Educational Review, Education Theory, Educational Research og Phi Delta Kapan, og sammen med Kathy Kinslows vant deres nylig publiserte bok Resegregation as Curriculum en pris; American Association for Teaching and Curriculum 2017 Book of the Year Award. 

Jerry Lee Rosiek is Professor of Education Studies at the University of Oregon where he teaches courses on the racial politics of education and qualitative research methodology.  His scholarship has experimented with the use of fiction and narrative modes of representations and is informed by revisionist pragmatism, new materialist philosophy, critical race theory, and Indigenous studies literature. His writing has appeared in Harvard Educational Review, Education Theory, Educational Research and Phi Delta Kapan and his recently published book, Resegregation as Curriculum (coauthored with Kathy Kinslow), won the American Association for Teaching and Curriculum 2017 Book of the Year Award. 

Rosiek vil holde to foredrag om følgende tema:
9-10.15 Indigenous Thought and the New Materialisms: A Path to Respectful Anti-Colonial Engagement.  
10.45-12 Quantum Diffraction in Qualitative Research: More than an Metaphor

Abstract:
9-10.15 Indigenous Thought and the New Materialisms: A Path to Respectful Anti-Colonial Engagement  
This talk explores the similarities and differences between new materialist conceptions of non-human agency and conceptions of non-human agency found in the Indigenous studies literature from around the globe. It notes the relative lack of engagement with Indigenous conceptions of non-human agency by new materialist scholars and highlights the way such silence is form of colonialist erasure.  

The Indigenous studies literature on this topic is found to be performatively consistent in ways that new materialist social science struggles to achieve at the moment. A path to a respectful non-extractive engagement with the Indigenous studies literature on non-human agency is proposed.  This talk is based on a recently published manuscript of the same title.
 
10.45-12 Quantum Diffraction in Qualitative Research: More than an Metaphor
New materialist, posthumanist, postqualitative literature in the social sciences have all been influenced by the work of physicist, philosopher, and feminist, Karen Barad. Barad draws upon her knowledge of quantum mechanics and subatomic physics to make a case for a radically transformed conception of inquiry that reaches far beyond protons and electrons and extends to the study of human affairs and ecological sustainability.  

The applications of her theories in the social science literature, however, are often imprecise and lend themselves to oversimplification. Barad is clear that she does not think that quantum mechanics serves as a mere metaphor for other forms of inquiry. This seminar will present the science of quantum mechanics in manner that is accessible to non-scientists. 

It will include a review of the famous diffraction grating experiments, the difference between Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle and Bohr’s principle of ontological indeterminacy, and the phenomena of quantum entanglement.  These ideas can often be intimidating, but at their heart offer simple—if disconcerting—shifts in our common sense notions of inquiry.  Connections that can and cannot be made to the practice of social science research will be discussed.